kodk-10q_20180331.htm

 

 

UNITED STATES

SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION

Washington, D.C. 20549

 

FORM 10-Q

 

 

Quarterly report pursuant to Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934

For the quarterly period ended March 31, 2018

or

 

Transition report pursuant to Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934

For the transition period from            to            

Commission File Number 1-87

 

EASTMAN KODAK COMPANY

(Exact name of registrant as specified in its charter)

 

 

NEW JERSEY

 

16-0417150

(State of incorporation)

 

(IRS Employer

Identification No.)

 

 

 

343 STATE STREET, ROCHESTER, NEW YORK

 

14650

(Address of principal executive offices)

 

(Zip Code)

Registrant’s telephone number, including area code: 585-724-4000

 

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant (1) has filed all reports required to be filed by Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 during the preceding 12 months, and (2) has been subject to such filing requirements for the past 90 days.  Yes      No  

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant has submitted electronically and posted on its corporate web site, if any, every Interactive Data File required to be submitted and posted pursuant to Rule 405 of Regulation S-T during the preceding 12 months.   Yes       No  

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a large accelerated filer, an accelerated filer, a non-accelerated filer, a smaller reporting company, or an emerging growth company.

See definition of “large accelerated filer,” “accelerated filer” “smaller reporting company” and “emerging growth company in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act.

 

Large accelerated filer

 

  

Accelerated filer

 

Non-accelerated filer

 

 (Do not check if a smaller reporting company)

  

Smaller reporting company

 

 

Emerging growth company

 

 

 

 

 

 

If an emerging growth company, indicate by check mark if the registrant has elected not to use the extended transition period for complying with any new or revised financial accounting standards provided pursuant to Section 13(a) of the Exchange Act.  

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a shell company (as defined in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act).    Yes     No 

As of May 1, 2018, the registrant had 42,654,527 shares of common stock, $0.01 par value per share, outstanding.

[1]


 

EASTMAN KODAK COMPANY

Form 10-Q

March 31, 2018

Table of Contents

 

 

 

 

 

Page

Part I.—Financial Information

 

 

 

 

 

Item 1.

 

Financial Statements

 

3

 

 

Consolidated Statement of Operations (Unaudited)

 

3

 

 

Consolidated Statement of Comprehensive (Loss) Income (Unaudited)

 

4

 

 

Consolidated Statement of Financial Position (Unaudited)

 

5

 

 

Consolidated Statement of Cash Flows (Unaudited)

 

6

 

 

Notes to Financial Statements (Unaudited)

 

7

Item 2.

 

Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations

 

23

 

 

Liquidity and Capital Resources

 

32

Item 3.

 

Quantitative and Qualitative Disclosures About Market Risk

 

34

Item 4.

 

Controls and Procedures

 

34

 

 

 

 

 

Part II. —Other Information

 

 

 

 

 

Item 1.

 

Legal Proceedings

 

35

Item 2.

 

Unregistered Sales of Securities and Use of Proceeds

 

35

Item 5.

 

Other Information

 

35

Item 6.

 

Exhibits

 

35

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Index to Exhibits

 

36

 

 

Signatures

 

37

 

 

[2]


Part I. FINANCIAL INFORMATION

Item 1. Financial Statements

EASTMAN KODAK COMPANY

CONSOLIDATED STATEMENT OF OPERATIONS (Unaudited)

(in millions, except per share data)

 

 

Three Months Ended

 

 

 

March 31,

 

(in millions)

 

2018

 

 

2017

 

Revenues

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Sales

 

$

285

 

 

$

283

 

Services

 

 

72

 

 

 

74

 

Total revenues

 

 

357

 

 

 

357

 

Cost of revenues

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Sales

 

 

252

 

 

 

241

 

Services

 

 

51

 

 

 

54

 

Total cost of revenues

 

 

303

 

 

 

295

 

Gross profit

 

 

54

 

 

 

62

 

Selling, general and administrative expenses

 

 

63

 

 

 

65

 

Research and development costs

 

 

15

 

 

 

20

 

Restructuring costs and other

 

 

2

 

 

 

7

 

Other operating expense, net

 

 

 

 

 

10

 

Loss from continuing operations before interest expense,

   other charges (income), net and income taxes

 

 

(26

)

 

 

(40

)

Interest expense

 

 

8

 

 

 

8

 

Pension income excluding service cost component

 

 

(32

)

 

 

(38

)

Other charges (income), net

 

 

16

 

 

 

(20

)

(Loss) earnings from continuing operations before income

   taxes

 

 

(18

)

 

 

10

 

Provision for income taxes

 

 

7

 

 

 

3

 

Net (loss) earnings

 

 

(25

)

 

 

7

 

Basic net (loss) earnings per share attributable to

   Eastman Kodak Company common shareholders

 

$

(0.70

)

 

$

0.05

 

Diluted net (loss) earnings per share attributable to

   Eastman Kodak Company common shareholders

 

$

(0.70

)

 

$

0.05

 

Number of common shares used in basic and diluted net

   (loss) earnings per share

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Basic

 

 

42.6

 

 

 

42.4

 

Diluted

 

 

42.6

 

 

 

42.7

 

 

The accompanying notes are an integral part of these consolidated financial statements.

[3]


EASTMAN KODAK COMPANY

CONSOLIDATED STATEMENT OF COMPREHENSIVE (LOSS) INCOME (Unaudited)

(in millions)

 

 

 

Three Months Ended

 

 

 

March 31,

 

(in millions)

 

2018

 

 

2017

 

NET (LOSS) INCOME

 

$

(25

)

 

$

7

 

Other comprehensive income, net of tax:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Currency translation adjustments

 

 

13

 

 

 

14

 

Pension and other postretirement benefit plan obligation activity,

   net of tax

 

 

 

 

 

(3

)

Other comprehensive income, net of tax attributable to Eastman

   Kodak Company

 

 

13

 

 

 

11

 

COMPREHENSIVE (LOSS) INCOME, NET OF TAX ATTRIBUTABLE

  TO EASTMAN KODAK COMPANY

 

$

(12

)

 

$

18

 

 

The accompanying notes are an integral part of these consolidated financial statements.

 

 

[4]


EASTMAN KODAK COMPANY

CONSOLIDATED STATEMENT OF FINANCIAL POSITION (Unaudited)

 

 

 

March 31,

 

 

December 31,

 

(in millions)

 

2018

 

 

2017

 

ASSETS

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Cash and cash equivalents

 

$

313

 

 

$

344

 

Trade receivables, net of allowances of $9 in each period

 

 

256

 

 

 

282

 

Inventories, net

 

 

305

 

 

 

276

 

Other current assets

 

 

62

 

 

 

56

 

Total current assets

 

 

936

 

 

 

958

 

Property, plant and equipment, net of accumulated depreciation of $411 and $394,

   respectively

 

 

311

 

 

 

314

 

Goodwill

 

 

32

 

 

 

32

 

Intangible assets, net

 

 

83

 

 

 

86

 

Restricted cash

 

 

12

 

 

 

17

 

Deferred income taxes

 

 

186

 

 

 

188

 

Other long-term assets

 

 

112

 

 

 

112

 

TOTAL ASSETS

 

$

1,672

 

 

$

1,707

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

LIABILITIES, REDEEMABLE CONVERTIBLE PREFERRED STOCK AND EQUITY

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Accounts payable, trade

 

$

191

 

 

$

198

 

Short-term borrowings and current portion of long-term debt

 

 

4

 

 

 

4

 

Other current liabilities

 

 

224

 

 

 

217

 

Total current liabilities

 

 

419

 

 

 

419

 

Long-term debt, net of current portion

 

 

399

 

 

 

399

 

Pension and other postretirement liabilities

 

 

449

 

 

 

466

 

Other long-term liabilities

 

 

207

 

 

 

202

 

Total Liabilities

 

 

1,474

 

 

 

1,486

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Commitments and Contingencies (Note 7)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Redeemable, convertible Series A preferred stock, no par value, $100 per share liquidation preference

 

166

 

 

164

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Equity (Deficit)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Common stock, $0.01 par value

 

 

 

 

 

 

Additional paid in capital

 

 

628

 

 

 

631

 

Treasury stock, at cost

 

 

(9

)

 

 

(9

)

Accumulated deficit

 

 

(209

)

 

 

(174

)

Accumulated other comprehensive loss

 

 

(378

)

 

 

(391

)

Total shareholders’ equity

 

 

32

 

 

 

57

 

TOTAL LIABILITIES, REDEEMABLE CONVERTIBLE PREFERRED STOCK AND EQUITY

 

$

1,672

 

 

$

1,707

 

 

The accompanying notes are an integral part of these consolidated financial statements.

 

 

[5]


EASTMAN KODAK COMPANY

CONSOLIDATED STATEMENT OF CASH FLOWS (Unaudited)

 

 

 

Three Months Ending

 

 

 

March 31,

 

(in millions)

 

2018

 

 

2017

 

Cash flows from operating activities:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Net (loss) earnings

 

$

(25

)

 

$

7

 

Adjustments to reconcile to net cash used in operating activities:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Depreciation and amortization

 

 

19

 

 

 

19

 

Pension income

 

 

(28

)

 

 

(32

)

Change in fair value of embedded conversion features derivative liability

 

 

14

 

 

 

(22

)

Prosper asset remeasurement

 

 

 

 

 

12

 

Non-cash restructuring costs and asset impairments

 

 

 

 

 

8

 

Net gain on sales of assets/businesses

 

 

(1

)

 

 

(2

)

Stock based compensation

 

 

2

 

 

 

2

 

Provision for deferred income taxes

 

 

2

 

 

 

1

 

Decrease in trade receivables

 

 

30

 

 

 

33

 

Increase in inventories

 

 

(27

)

 

 

(40

)

Decrease in trade payables

 

 

(6

)

 

 

(24

)

Decrease in liabilities excluding borrowings and trade payables

 

 

(9

)

 

 

(20

)

Other items, net

 

 

2

 

 

 

5

 

Total adjustments

 

 

(2

)

 

 

(60

)

Net cash used in operating activities

 

 

(27

)

 

 

(53

)

Cash flows from investing activities:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Additions to properties

 

 

(10

)

 

 

(7

)

Proceeds from sales of assets/businesses, net

 

 

 

 

 

2

 

Proceeds from sales of marketable securities

 

 

 

 

 

1

 

Net cash used in investing activities

 

 

(10

)

 

 

(4

)

Cash flows from financing activities:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Repayment of capital leases

 

 

(1

)

 

 

(1

)

Preferred stock dividend payments

 

 

(3

)

 

 

(2

)

Net cash used in financing activities

 

 

(4

)

 

 

(3

)

Effect of exchange rate changes on cash

 

 

5

 

 

 

4

 

Net decrease in cash, cash equivalents and restricted cash

 

 

(36

)

 

 

(56

)

Cash, cash equivalents and restricted cash, beginning of period

 

 

369

 

 

 

478

 

Cash, cash equivalents and restricted cash, end of period

 

$

333

 

 

$

422

 

 

The accompanying notes are an integral part of these consolidated financial statements. 

[6]


EASTMAN KODAK COMPANY

NOTES TO FINANCIAL STATEMENTS (Unaudited)

 

NOTE 1: BASIS OF PRESENTATION AND RECENT ACCOUNTING PRONOUNCEMENTS

 

BASIS OF PRESENTATION

 

The consolidated interim financial statements are unaudited, and certain information and footnote disclosures related thereto normally included in financial statements prepared in accordance with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States of America (“U.S. GAAP”) have been omitted in accordance with the instructions to Form 10-Q and Rule 10-01 of Regulation S-X. In the opinion of management, the accompanying unaudited consolidated interim financial statements reflect all adjustments (consisting of normal recurring adjustments) necessary for a fair statement of the results of operations, financial position and cash flows of Eastman Kodak Company (“EKC” or the “Company”) and all companies directly or indirectly controlled, either through majority ownership or otherwise (collectively, “Kodak”). The results of operations for the interim periods are not necessarily indicative of the results for the entire fiscal year. These consolidated interim statements should be read in conjunction with the Company’s Annual Report on Form 10-K for the year ended December 31, 2017.

 

RECENTLY ADOPTED ACCOUNTING PRONOUNCEMENTS

 

In March 2017, the Financial Accounting Standards Board (“FASB”) issued Accounting Standards Update (“ASU”) 2017-07, Compensation—Retirements Benefits (Topic 715): Improving the Presentation of Net Periodic Pension Cost and Net Periodic Postretirement Benefit Cost.  ASU 2017-07 requires entities to report the service cost component in the same line item(s) as other compensation costs arising from services rendered during the period and to report all other components of net benefit costs outside a subtotal of income from operations. In addition, the ASU allows only the service cost component to be eligible for capitalization when applicable. ASU 2017-07 is effective for fiscal years, and interim periods within those years, beginning after December 15, 2017 (January 1, 2018 for Kodak). Kodak adopted ASU 2017-07 effective January 1, 2018, retrospectively for the presentation of the service cost and other cost components and prospectively for the application of the capitalization eligibility. The components of net benefit cost are shown in Note 14, “Retirement Plans and Other Postretirement Benefits”. The guidance impacted presentation in Kodak’s consolidated financial statements and the capitalization of costs to inventory. The presentation of the service cost component was consistent with the requirements of the new standard. The other components (which were presented within Cost of revenues, Selling and general administrative expenses and Research and development costs) are being presented separately on the face of the Consolidated Statement of Operations. The segment measure of profit and loss previously included only the service cost and amortization of prior service credits components of net periodic pension and postretirement benefit costs (refer to Note 20, “Segment Information”). Effective January 1, 2018, the segment measure of profit and loss only includes the service cost component of net periodic pension and postretirement benefit costs and prior periods have been reclassified to conform to this presentation.  

 

In February 2017, the FASB issued ASU 2017-05, Other Income—Gains and Losses from the Derecognition of Nonfinancial Assets (Subtopic 610-20): Clarifying the Scope of Asset Derecognition Guidance and Accounting for Partial Sales of Nonfinancial Assets. ASU 2017-05 defines in-substance nonfinancial assets, provides guidance with respect to accounting for partial sales of nonfinancial assets and conforms the derecognition guidance on nonfinancial assets with the model for transactions in the new revenue standard (Topic 606 as described below). ASU 2017-05 is effective for fiscal years, and interim periods within those years, beginning after December 15, 2017 (January 1, 2018 for Kodak) and allows either a full retrospective adoption to all periods presented or a modified retrospective adoption approach with the cumulative effect of initial application recognized at the date of initial application. Kodak adopted ASU 2017-05 effective January 1, 2018 using the modified retrospective adoption approach.  The application of this standard did not have a significant impact on Kodak’s consolidated financial statements.  

 

In January 2016, the FASB issued ASU 2016-01, Financial Instruments—Overall (Topic 825): Recognition and Measurement of Financial Assets and Financial Liabilities. ASU 2016-01 primarily affects the accounting for equity investments, financial liabilities under the fair value option, and the presentation and disclosure requirements for financial instruments. Under the ASU all equity investments in unconsolidated entities (other than those accounted for using the equity method of accounting) will generally be measured at fair value through earnings. In addition, the FASB clarified guidance related to the valuation allowance assessment when recognizing deferred tax assets resulting from unrealized losses on available-for-sale debt securities. The classification and measurement guidance is effective for Kodak beginning January 1, 2018, including interim periods within those fiscal years. Kodak adopted ASU 2016-01 effective January 1, 2018.  The adoption of this guidance did not have a material impact on Kodak’s consolidated financial statements.    

 

[7]


In May 2014, the FASB issued ASU 2014-09, “Revenue from Contracts with Customers (Topic 606).” ASU 2014-09 supersedes the revenue recognition requirements in Topic 605, “Revenue Recognition” and most industry-specific guidance. The core principle of ASU 2014-09 is that a company will recognize revenue when it transfers promised goods or services to customers in an amount that reflects the consideration to which the company expects to be entitled in exchange for those goods or services. In addition, the standard requires disclosure of the nature, amount, timing, and uncertainty of revenue and cash flows arising from contracts with customers. The new revenue standard is effective for fiscal years, and interim periods within those years, beginning after December 15, 2017 (January 1, 2018 for Kodak) and allows either a full retrospective adoption to all periods presented or a modified retrospective adoption approach with the cumulative effect of initial application recognized at the date of initial application. Kodak adopted the provisions of the new standard effective January 1, 2018 using the modified retrospective method which allows companies to record a one-time adjustment to opening retained earnings for the cumulative effect the standard will have on open contracts at the time of adoption. Kodak derives revenue from various brand licensing arrangements, which may include upfront payments and/or sales based royalties subject to minimum annual guaranteed amounts. Kodak recorded a cumulative effect adjustment of approximately $10 million as a decrease to the opening balance of retained earnings related to these arrangements. With the exception of brand license revenue, Kodak did not identify any changes in the timing of revenue recognition that resulted in a material transition adjustment. 

 

The cumulative effect of the changes made to the Consolidated Statement of Financial Position for January 1, 2018 for the adoption of ASU 2014-09 were as follows.  The net reduction in opening retained earnings primarily reflected the impact related to brand licensing revenues.

 

(in millions)

 

Balance at

December 31,

2017

 

Adjustments Due to

ASU 2014-09

 

Balance at

January 1,

2018

 

Liabilities

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Other current liabilities

 

$

217

 

$

2

 

$

219

 

Other long-term liabilities

 

 

202

 

 

8

 

 

210

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Deficit

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Accumulated Deficit

 

 

(174

)

 

(10

)

 

(184

)

 

The impact of the adoption on the Consolidated Statement of Operations and Consolidated Statement of Financial Position were as follows:

 

 

 

Three Months Ended March 31, 2018

 

(in millions)

 

As Reported

 

Balances without Adoption of

ASU 2014-09

 

Effect of Change

Higher (Lower)

 

Revenues

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Sales

 

$

285

 

$

284

 

$

1

 

Services

 

 

72

 

 

72

 

 

 

Total revenues

 

 

357

 

 

356

 

 

1

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Net income

 

$

(25

)

$

(26

)

$

1

 

 

 

 

March 31, 2018

 

(in millions)

 

As Reported

 

Balances without Adoption of

ASU 2014-09

 

Effect of Change

Higher (Lower)

 

Liabilities

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Other current liabilities

 

$

224

 

$

222

 

$

2

 

Other long-term liabilities

 

 

207

 

 

200

 

 

7

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Deficit

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Accumulated Deficit

 

 

(209

)

 

(200

)

 

(9

)

 

 

[8]


RECENTLY ISSUED ACCOUNTING PRONOUNCEMENTS

 

In February 2018, the FASB issued ASU 2018-02, “Income Statement—Reporting Comprehensive Income (Topic 220): Reclassification of Certain Tax Effects from Accumulated Other Comprehensive Income”. The ASU addresses certain stranded income tax effects in accumulated other comprehensive income (AOCI) resulting from the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act (the “2017 Tax Act”). The ASU provides an option to reclassify stranded tax effects within AOCI to retained earnings in each period in which the effect of the change in the U.S. federal corporate income tax rate in the 2017 Tax Act (or portion thereof) is recorded and requires additional disclosures. The ASU is effective for fiscal years beginning after December 15, 2018 (January 1, 2019 for Kodak) and interim periods within those fiscal years. Early adoption is permitted and may be applied either in the period of adoption or retrospectively to each period (or periods) in which the effect of the change in the U.S. federal corporate income tax rate in the 2017 Tax Act is recognized. Kodak is currently evaluating the impact of this ASU.

 

In June 2016, the FASB issued ASU 2016-13, Financial Instruments—Credit Losses (Topic 326): Measurement of Credit Losses on Financial Instruments.  ASU 2016-13 requires a financial asset (or a group of financial assets) measured at amortized cost basis to be presented at the net amount expected to be collected.  In addition, the ASU requires credit losses relating to available-for-sale debt securities to be recorded through an allowance for credit losses.  The amendments in this ASU broaden the information that an entity must consider in developing its expected credit loss estimate for assets measured either collectively or individually. The new standard is effective for fiscal years, and for interim periods within those fiscal years, beginning after December 15, 2019 (January 1, 2020 for Kodak).  Early adoption is permitted for fiscal years, and interim periods within those years, beginning after December 15, 2018 (January 1, 2019 for Kodak).  Kodak is currently evaluating the impact of this ASU.  

 

In February 2016, the FASB issued ASU 2016-02, Leases (Topic 842). ASU 2016-02 requires lessees to recognize most leases on their balance sheets as lease liabilities with corresponding right-of-use assets and eliminates certain real estate-specific provisions. The new leasing standard is effective for fiscal years, and for interim periods within those fiscal years, beginning after December 15, 2018 (January 1, 2019 for Kodak).  Early adoption is permitted. Kodak plans to adopt the new standard on the effective date and is currently evaluating the impact of this ASU on its financial statements.  Kodak anticipates that the adoption of the amended lease guidance will materially affect its Consolidated Statement of Financial Position and will require certain changes to its systems and processes.  

 

 

NOTE 2: CASH, CASH EQUIVALENTS AND RESTRICTED CASH

 

The following table provides a reconciliation of cash, cash equivalents and restricted cash reported within the Statement of Financial Position that sums to the total of such amounts shown in the Statement of Cash Flows:

 

 

 

March 31,

 

 

December 31,

 

(in millions)

 

2018

 

 

2017

 

Cash and cash equivalents

 

$

313

 

 

$

344

 

Restricted cash included in Other current assets

 

 

8

 

 

 

8

 

Long-term restricted cash

 

 

12

 

 

 

17

 

Total cash, cash equivalents and restricted cash shown in the Statement of Cash Flows

 

$

333

 

 

$

369

 

 

Restricted cash included in Other current assets on the Statement of Financial Position primarily represents amounts which support hedging activities.

 

Long-term restricted cash includes $6 million of security posted related to Brazilian legal contingencies and also includes $0 million and $6 million as of March 31, 2018 and December 31, 2017, respectively, supporting compliance with the Excess Availability threshold under the Amended and Restated Credit Agreement (the “Amended Credit Agreement”).

 

NOTE 3: INVENTORIES, NET

 

 

 

March 31,

 

 

December 31,

 

(in millions)

 

2018

 

 

2017

 

Finished goods

 

$

170

 

 

$

159

 

Work in process

 

 

64

 

 

 

57

 

Raw materials

 

 

71

 

 

 

60

 

Total

 

$

305

 

 

$

276

 

 

 

 

[9]


NOTE 4: OTHER CURRENT LIABILITIES

 

 

 

March 31,

 

 

December 31,

 

(in millions)

 

2018

 

 

2017

 

Employee related liabilities

 

$

50

 

 

$

47

 

Deferred revenue

 

 

32

 

 

 

30

 

Deferred consideration on disposed businesses

 

 

24

 

 

 

10

 

Customer rebates

 

 

23

 

 

 

29

 

Workers compensation

 

 

10

 

 

 

10

 

Restructuring liabilities

 

 

8

 

 

 

10

 

Other

 

 

77

 

 

 

81

 

Total

 

$

224

 

 

$

217

 

 

The customer rebate amounts will potentially be settled through customer deductions applied to outstanding trade receivables in lieu of cash payments.

 

 

NOTE 5: OTHER LONG-TERM LIABILITIES

 

 

 

March 31,

 

 

December 31,

 

(in millions)

 

2018

 

 

2017

 

Workers compensation

 

$

96

 

 

$

96

 

Asset retirement obligations

 

 

46

 

 

 

43

 

Deferred taxes

 

 

16

 

 

 

16

 

Deferred consideration on disposed businesses

 

 

 

 

 

14

 

Environmental liabilities

 

 

12

 

 

 

12

 

Embedded conversion features derivative liability (1)

 

 

9

 

 

 

 

Other

 

 

28

 

 

 

21

 

Total

 

$

207

 

 

$

202

 

 

 

(1)

Refer to Note 21, “Financial Instruments”

 

[10]


NOTE 6:  DEBT AND CAPITAL LEASES

Debt and capital leases and related maturities and interest rates were as follows at March 31, 2018 and December 31, 2017 (in millions):

 

(in millions)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

March 31,

2018

 

 

December 31,

2017

 

 

 

Type

 

Maturity

 

Weighted-Average

Effective Interest Rate

 

 

Carrying Value

 

 

Carrying Value

 

Current portion:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Capital leases

 

Various

 

Various

 

 

 

3

 

 

 

3

 

 

 

Other debt

 

Various

 

Various

 

 

 

1

 

 

 

1

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

4

 

 

 

4

 

Non-current portion:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Term note

 

2019

 

7.34%

 

 

 

393

 

 

 

393

 

 

 

Capital leases

 

Various

 

Various

 

 

 

4

 

 

 

4

 

 

 

Other debt

 

Various

 

Various

 

 

 

2

 

 

 

2

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

399

 

 

 

399

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

$

403

 

 

$

403

 

 

On September 3, 2013, the Company entered into (i) a Senior Secured First Lien Term Credit Agreement (the “First Lien Term Credit Agreement”) with the lenders party thereto (the “First Lien Lenders”), JPMorgan Chase Bank, N.A. as administrative agent, and J.P. Morgan Securities LLC, Barclays Bank PLC, and Merrill Lynch, Pierce, Fenner & Smith Inc. as joint lead arrangers and joint bookrunners, and (ii) a Senior Secured Second Lien Term Credit Agreement (the “Second Lien Term Credit Agreement,” and together with the First Lien Term Credit Agreement, the “Term Credit Agreements”), with the lenders party thereto (the “Second Lien Lenders,” and together with the First Lien Lenders, the “Term Credit Lenders”), Barclays Bank PLC as administrative agent, and J.P. Morgan Securities LLC, Barclays Bank PLC and Merrill Lynch, Pierce, Fenner & Smith Inc. as joint lead arrangers and joint bookrunners.  Additionally, the Company and its U.S. subsidiaries (the “Subsidiary Guarantors”) entered into an Asset Based Revolving Credit Agreement (the “ABL Credit Agreement” and together with the Term Credit Agreements, the “Credit Agreements”) with the lenders party thereto (the “ABL Lenders” and together with the First Lien Lenders and the Second Lien Lenders, the “Lenders”) and Bank of America N.A. as administrative agent and collateral agent, Barclays Bank PLC as syndication agent and Merrill Lynch, Pierce, Fenner & Smith Inc., Barclays Bank PLC and J.P. Morgan Securities LLC as joint lead arrangers and joint bookrunners.  Pursuant to the terms of the Credit Agreements, the Term Credit Lenders provided the Company with term loan facilities in an aggregate principal amount of $695 million, consisting of $420 million of first-lien term loans (the “First Lien Loans”) and $275 million of second-lien term loans (the “Second Lien Loans”).  Net proceeds from the Term Credit Agreements were $664 million ($695 million aggregate principal less $15 million stated discount and $16 million in debt transaction costs). The loans  made under the First Lien Term Credit Agreement become due on the earlier to occur of (i) the maturity date of September 3, 2019 or (ii) the acceleration of such loans following the occurrence of an event of default (as defined in the First Lien Term Credit Agreement).  The Second Lien Term Credit Agreement was prepaid and terminated on November 15, 2016.  

 

The Credit Agreements limit, among other things, the Company’s and the Subsidiary Guarantors’ ability to (i) incur indebtedness, (ii) incur or create liens, (iii) dispose of assets, (iv) make restricted payments (including dividend payments, et al.) and (v) make investments.  In addition to other customary affirmative covenants, the Credit Agreements provide for a periodic delivery by the Company of its various financial statements as set forth in the Credit Agreements.  Events of default under the Credit Agreements include, among others, failure to pay any loan, interest or other amount due under the applicable credit agreement, breach of specific covenants and a change of control of the Company.  Upon an event of default, the applicable lenders may declare the outstanding obligations under the applicable credit agreement to be immediately due and payable and exercise other rights and remedies provided for in such credit agreement.

 

The First Lien Loans bear interest at the rate of LIBOR plus 6.25% per annum, with a LIBOR floor of 1% or Alternate Base Rate (as defined in the First Lien Term Credit Agreement) plus 5.25%.   Each existing and future direct or indirect U.S. subsidiary of the Company (other than immaterial subsidiaries, unrestricted subsidiaries and certain other subsidiaries) have agreed to provide unconditional guarantees of the obligations of the Company under the Credit Agreements. Subject to certain exceptions, obligations under the First Lien Term Credit Agreement are secured by: (i) a first lien on all assets of the Company and the Subsidiary Guarantors, other than the ABL Collateral (as defined below), including a first lien on 100% of the stock of material domestic subsidiaries and 65% of the stock of material first-tier foreign subsidiaries (collectively the “Term Collateral”) and (ii) a second lien on the ABL Collateral. Obligations under the Asset Based Revolving Credit Agreement are secured by: (i) a first lien on cash, accounts receivable, inventory, machinery and equipment (the “ABL Collateral”) and (ii) a second lien on the Term Collateral.  The Company may voluntarily prepay the First Lien Loan. 

 

As defined in the First Lien Term Credit Agreement, the Company is required to prepay loans with net proceeds from asset sales, recovery events or issuance of indebtedness, subject to, in the case of net proceeds received from asset sales or recovery events, reinvestment rights by the Company in assets used or usable by the business within certain time limits.  During 2016 and 2017, Kodak prepaid $11 million of principal under the First Lien Term Credit Agreement.  Under the terms of the First Lien Term Credit Agreement, the prepayments were applied first to the installment principal

[11]


payments of $4 million due over the next twelve months, then ratably to the remaining scheduled payments.  With the prepayments, Kodak does not owe any future scheduled principal payments until the maturity date of the loan.

On an annual basis, the Company will prepay on June 30 of the following fiscal year loans in an amount equal to a percentage of Excess Cash Flow (“ECF”) as defined in the First Lien Term Credit Agreement, provided no such prepayment is required if such prepayment would cause U.S. liquidity (as defined in the First Lien Term Credit Agreement) to be less than $100 million or the Secured Leverage ratio is less than 2.25 to 1.00.  For the year ended December 31, 2017 ECF was a negative amount.   Therefore, no prepayment of First Lien term debt was required.  Any mandatory prepayments as described above shall be reduced by any mandatory prepayments of the First Lien Loan.

 

Under the First Lien Term Credit Agreement, the Company is required to maintain a Secured Leverage Ratio (as defined therein) not to exceed specified levels. The Secured Leverage Ratio under the First Lien Term Credit Agreement is tested at the end of each quarter based on the prior four quarters.  The maximum Secured Leverage Ratio permitted under the First Lien Term Credit Agreement is  2.75:1.  As of March 31, 2018 and December 31, 2017, Kodak was in compliance with all covenants under the First Lien Term Credit Agreement.  

 

Under the terms of the Credit Agreements, the Company may designate Restricted Subsidiaries as Unrestricted Subsidiaries provided the aggregate sales of all Unrestricted Subsidiaries are less than 7.5% of the consolidated sales of Kodak and the aggregate assets of all Unrestricted Subsidiaries are less than 7.5% of Kodak’s consolidated assets.  Further, under the Amended Credit Agreement, on a pro forma basis at the time of designation and immediately after giving effect thereto, Excess Availability must be at least $30 million and the pro forma Fixed Charge Coverage Ratio must be no less than 1.0 to 1.0.  Upon designation of Unrestricted Subsidiaries, the Company will be required to provide to the Lenders reconciling statements to eliminate all financial information pertaining to Unrestricted Subsidiaries which is included in its annual and quarterly financial statements.

 

In March 2018, the Company designated five subsidiaries as Unrestricted Subsidiaries, Kodak PE Tech, LLC, Kodak LB Tech, LLC, Kodak Realty, Inc., Kodakit Singapore Pte. Limited and KP Services (Jersey) Ltd.  This action allowed the Company to better position assets which may be monetized in the future and address costs related to underutilized properties.  Collectively, these subsidiaries had sales of approximately $2 million for the quarter ended March 31, 2018 and assets of $23 million as of March 31, 2018, which represent 0% and 1%, respectively, of Kodak’s consolidated sales for the quarter ended March 31, 2018 and consolidated assets as of March 31, 2018. Each of the capitalized but undefined terms has the meaning ascribed to such term in the Credit Agreements.

 

Kodak intends to conduct its operations in a manner that will result in continued compliance with the Credit Agreements; however, compliance for future quarters may depend on Kodak undertaking one or more non-operational transactions, such as the repatriation of cash into the U.S., the management of operating cash outflows, the designation of additional subsidiaries as Unrestricted Subsidiaries, a monetization of assets, a debt refinancing, the raising of equity capital, or a similar transaction.  If Kodak is unable to remain in compliance and does not make alternate arrangements with its term lenders, an event of default would occur under Kodak’s credit agreements which, among other remedies, would entitle the lenders or their agents to declare the outstanding obligations under the Term Credit Agreement to be immediately due and payable.  There is no assurance Kodak will be able to complete any non-operational transaction it may undertake to maintain compliance with covenants under the Credit Agreements or to refinance, or otherwise pay, the First Lien Loans on or before the maturity date of September 3, 2019 or the obligations under the ABL Credit Agreement on June 6, 2019 if the First Lien Loans are not refinanced or paid on or before such date.

 

Amended and Restated Credit Agreement

On May 26, 2016, the Company and certain of its domestic subsidiaries (the “Subsidiary Guarantors”) entered into an Amended and Restated Credit Agreement (the “Amended Credit Agreement” or “ABL Credit Agreement”) with the lenders party thereto (the “Lenders”), Bank of America, N.A., as administrative and collateral agent, and Bank of America, N.A. and JPMorgan Chase Bank, N.A., as joint lead arrangers and joint bookrunners, which amended and restated the existing Asset Based Revolving Credit Agreement, dated as of September 3, 2013 (the “Prior Credit Agreement”). Each of the capitalized but undefined terms used in the context of describing the Amended Credit Agreement has the meaning ascribed to such term in the Amended Credit Agreement.

 

The Amended Credit Agreement decreased the aggregate amount of commitments from $200 million to $150 million and extended the maturity date to the earlier of May 26, 2021 or the date that is 90 days prior to the earliest scheduled maturity date of any of the Company’s outstanding term loans or refinancings thereof, of which the earliest maturity date is currently September 3, 2019.   The Amended Credit Agreement, among other things, lowered reserve requirements by eliminating the Availability Block and removed the ability to use Qualified Cash to support Excess Availability.

 

Each existing direct or indirect U.S. subsidiary of the Company (other than Immaterial Subsidiaries, Unrestricted Subsidiaries and certain other subsidiaries) has reaffirmed its unconditional guarantee (and any such future subsidiaries must provide an unconditional guarantee) of the obligations of the Company under the Amended Credit Agreement.

 

The Lenders will make available asset-based revolving loans (the “ABL Loans”) and letters of credit in an aggregate amount of up to $150 million, subject to the Borrowing Base.  The Company has issued approximately $79 million and $96 million of letters of credit under the Amended Credit Agreement as of March 31, 2018 and December 31, 2017, respectively.  The Company had approximately $36 million and $20 million of Excess

[12]


Availability under the Amended Credit Agreement as of March 31, 2018 and December 31, 2017, respectively.  Availability is subject to the borrowing base calculation, reserves and other limitations.

 

The ABL Loans bear interest at the rate of LIBOR plus 2.25% - 2.75% per annum or Base Rate plus 1.25% - 1.75% per annum based on Excess Availability.

 

Excess Availability is equal to the sum of (i) 85% of the amount of the Eligible Receivables less a Dilution Reserve, (ii) the lesser of 85% of Net Orderly Liquidation Value or 75% of the Eligible Inventory (iii) the lesser of 75% of Orderly Liquidation Value of Eligible Equipment or $14 million, as of March 31, 2018 (which $14 million decreases by $1 million per quarter) and (iv) Eligible Cash less (a) Rent and Charges Reserves, (b) Principal Outstanding and (c) Outstanding Letters of Credit.

 

Under the Amended Credit Agreement, Kodak is required to maintain a minimum Fixed Charge Coverage Ratio of 1.00 to 1.00 when Excess Availability is less than 12.5% of lender commitments.  As of March 31, 2018 and December 31, 2017, 12.5% of lender commitments were $18.75 million. 

 

If Excess Availability falls below 12.5% of lender commitments, Kodak may, in addition to the requirement to be in compliance with the minimum Fixed Charge Coverage Ratio, become subject to cash dominion control.  Since Excess Availability was greater than 12.5% of lender commitments at March 31, 2018 and December 31, 2017, Kodak is not required to have a minimum Fixed Charges Coverage Ratio of 1.0 to 1.0.  As of March 31, 2018 and December 31, 2017, Kodak was in compliance with all the covenants under the Amended Credit Agreement. 

 

 

NOTE 7: COMMITMENTS AND CONTINGENCIES

As of March 31, 2018, the Company had outstanding letters of credit of $79 million issued under the Amended Credit Agreement, as well as bank guarantees and letters of credit of $4 million, surety bonds in the amount of $53 million, and restricted cash and deposits of $26 million, primarily to ensure the payment of possible casualty and workers’ compensation claims, environmental liabilities, legal contingencies and rental payments and to support various customs, tax and trade activities. The restricted cash and deposits are reflected in Restricted cash, Other current assets and Other long-term assets in the Consolidated Statement of Financial Position.

Kodak’s Brazilian operations are involved in various litigation matters and have received or been the subject of numerous governmental assessments related to indirect and other taxes in various stages of litigation, as well as civil litigation and disputes associated with former employees and contract labor.  The tax matters, which comprise the majority of the litigation matters, are primarily related to federal and state value-added taxes.  Kodak is disputing these matters and intends to vigorously defend its position. Kodak routinely assesses all these matters as to the probability of ultimately incurring a liability in its Brazilian operations and records its best estimate of the ultimate loss in situations where it assesses the likelihood of loss as probable. As of March 31, 2018, the unreserved portion of these contingencies, inclusive of any related interest and penalties, for which there was at least a reasonable possibility that a loss may be incurred, amounted to approximately $24 million.

In connection with assessments in Brazil, local regulations may require Kodak to post security for a portion of the amounts in dispute. As of March 31, 2018, Kodak has posted security composed of $6 million of pledged cash reported within Restricted cash in the Consolidated Statement of Financial Position and liens on certain Brazilian assets with a net book value of approximately $71 million.  Generally, any encumbrances on the Brazilian assets would be removed to the extent the matter is resolved in Kodak's favor.

Kodak is involved in various lawsuits, claims, investigations, remediations and proceedings, including, from time to time, commercial, customs, employment, environmental, tort and health and safety matters, which are being handled and defended in the ordinary course of business.  Kodak is also subject, from time to time, to various assertions, claims, proceedings and requests for indemnification concerning intellectual property, including patent infringement suits involving technologies that are incorporated in a broad spectrum of Kodak’s products.  These matters are in various stages of investigation and litigation and are being vigorously defended.  Based on information currently available, Kodak does not believe that it is probable that the outcomes in any of these matters, individually or collectively, will have a material adverse effect on its financial position or results of operations.  Litigation is inherently unpredictable, and judgments could be rendered or settlements entered that could adversely affect Kodak’s operating results or cash flows in a particular period.  Kodak routinely assesses all of its litigation and threatened litigation as to the probability of ultimately incurring a liability, and records its best estimate of the ultimate loss in situations where it assesses the likelihood of loss as probable.

 

NOTE 8: GUARANTEES

EKC guarantees obligations to third parties for some of its consolidated subsidiaries. The maximum amount guaranteed is $7 million and the outstanding amount for those guarantees is $3 million.

In connection with the settlement of certain of the Company’s historical environmental liabilities at Eastman Business Park, in the event the historical liabilities exceed $99 million, the Company will become liable for 50% of the portion above $99 million with no limitation to the maximum potential future payments. There is no liability recorded for this guarantee.

[13]


Extended Warranty Arrangements

Kodak offers its customers extended warranty arrangements that are generally one year, but may range from three months to six years after the original warranty period.  The change in Kodak’s deferred revenue balance in relation to these extended warranty and maintenance arrangements from December 31, 2017 to March 31, 2018, which is reflected in Other current liabilities in the accompanying Consolidated Statement of Financial Position, was as follows:

 

(in millions)

 

 

 

 

Deferred revenue on extended warranties as of December 31, 2017

 

$

23

 

New extended warranty and maintenance arrangements in 2018

 

 

28

 

Recognition of extended warranty and maintenance arrangement revenue in 2018

 

 

(29

)

Deferred revenue on extended warranties as of March 31, 2018

 

$

22

 

 

 

NOTE 9:  REVENUE

 

Revenue Recognition

Kodak’s revenue transactions include sales of products (such as components and consumables for use in Kodak and other manufacturers’ equipment and film based products); equipment; software; services; integrated solutions; and intellectual property and brand licensing. Revenue from services includes extended warranty, customer support and maintenance agreements, consulting, business process services, training and education.

 

Revenues are recognized when control of the promised goods or services is transferred to customers in an amount that reflects the consideration Kodak expects to be entitled to in exchange for those goods or services.

 

For product sales (such as plates, film, inks and other consumables) revenue is recognized when control has transferred from Kodak to the buyer, which may be upon shipment or upon delivery to the customer site, based on contract terms or legal requirements in certain jurisdictions. Service revenue is recognized using the time-based method ratably over the contractual period as it best depicts when the customer receives the benefit from the service.  Service revenue for time and materials based agreements is recognized as services are performed.

 

Equipment is generally dependent on, and interrelated with, the underlying operating system (firm ware) and cannot function without the operating system. In these cases, the hardware and software license are accounted for as a single performance obligation. Contracts with customers may include multiple performance obligations including equipment, and optional software licenses and service agreements. Service agreements may be prepaid or paid over-time and range from three months to six years. For such arrangements, revenue is allocated to each performance obligation based on its relative standalone selling price. Standalone selling prices are based on the prices charged to customers or using expected cost-plus margin.

 

For non-complex equipment installations and software sales (Prepress, Packaging and Prosper Components and Unified Workflow Solutions businesses) revenue is recognized when control of each distinct performance obligation has transferred from Kodak to the buyer, which is generally met when the equipment or software is delivered and installed at the customer site as delivery and installation generally occur within the same period.  For complex equipment installations or integrated software solutions (Prosper Presses, Electrophotographic Printing Solutions Printers, Unified Workflow Solutions) revenue is deferred until receipt of customer acceptance and control has transferred to the buyer.

 

Software licenses are sold both in bundled equipment arrangements as discussed above or on a stand-alone basis (Unified Workflow Solutions business).  Software licenses are generally perpetual and are usually sold with post-contract support services (“PCS”) which are considered distinct performance obligations as the customer’s use of the existing software is not dependent upon future upgrades. Kodak recognizes software revenue at the time that the customer obtains control over the software which generally occurs upon installation while revenue allocated to the PCS is recognized over the service period.

 

In service arrangements such as consulting or business process services (Kodak Technology Solutions business) where final acceptance by the customer is required, revenue is deferred until all acceptance criteria have been met and Kodak has a legal right to payment.

 

Kodak’s licensing revenue is comprised of software licenses as discussed above, licenses to use functional intellectual property (patents and technical know-how) and licenses to use symbolic intellectual property (brand names and trademarks) (Consumer and Film businesses).  The timing and the amount of revenue recognized from the licensing of intellectual property depends upon a variety of factors, including the nature of the performance obligations (functional vs. symbolic licenses) specific terms of each agreement, and the payment terms. Aside from software licenses discussed above, Kodak’s functional licenses generally provide the right to use functional intellectual property; therefore, non-sales/usage-based revenue is recognized when the customer has the right to use the intellectual property while sales and usage-based royalties are recognized in the period the related sales and usage occurs.  Revenue for symbolic licenses such as brand licenses are recognized over time.

 

[14]


Deferred revenue is recorded when cash payments are received in advance of satisfying performance obligations such as deposits required in advance on equipment orders, prepaid service contracts or prepaid royalties on intellectual property arrangements. Interest expense is imputed for payments received greater than one year in advance of performance.

 

Payment terms and conditions vary by contract type, although terms generally include a requirement of payment within 30 to 60 days. Kodak applies the practical expedient with respect to implied financial components and only imputes interest for payment terms greater than one year.

 

Sales and usage-based taxes are excluded from revenues. Certain customers may receive cash-based incentives or credits, which are accounted for as variable consideration. Kodak estimates these amounts based on the expected amount to be provided to customers.

 

Kodak expenses sales commissions when incurred if the amortization period would be one year or less. These costs are recorded in Selling, general and administrative expenses. Kodak accrues the estimated cost of post-sale obligations, including basic product warranties, at the time of revenue recognition. Shipping and handling costs are accounted for as fulfillment costs and are included in cost of sales.

 

Kodak does not disclose the value of unsatisfied performance obligations for contracts with an original expected length of one year or less or for which revenue is recognized at the amount to which Kodak has the right to invoice for services performed. Performance obligations with an original expected length of greater than one year generally consist of deferred service contracts, operating leases and licensing arrangements. As of March 31, 2018, there was approximately $75 million of remaining performance obligations. Approximately 30% of the remaining performance obligations are expected to be recognized in 2018, and 2019, 20% in 2020 and 20% thereafter.

 

Disaggregation of Revenue

The following tables present revenue disaggregated by major product, portfolio summary and geography.

 

Major product:

 

 

 

Three Months Ended

 

 

 

March 31, 2018

 

 

 

Print Systems

 

 

Enterprise Inkjet Solutions

 

 

Flexographic Packaging Printing

 

 

Software & Solutions

 

 

Consumer & Film

 

 

Advanced Materials and 3D Technology Solutions

 

 

Eastman Business Park

 

 

Total

 

Plates, inks and other

   consumables

 

$

167

 

 

$

8

 

 

$

32

 

 

$

 

 

$

5

 

 

$

 

 

$

 

 

$

212

 

Ongoing service

   arrangements (1)

 

 

34

 

 

 

20

 

 

 

2

 

 

 

12

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

68

 

Total Annuities

 

 

201

 

 

 

28

 

 

 

34

 

 

 

12

 

 

 

5

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

280

 

Equipment & Software

 

 

15

 

 

 

3

 

 

 

3

 

 

 

4

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

25

 

Film and chemicals

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

40

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

40

 

Other (2)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

4

 

 

 

3

 

 

 

1

 

 

 

4

 

 

 

12

 

Total

 

$

216

 

 

$

31

 

 

$

37

 

 

$

20

 

 

$

48

 

 

$

1

 

 

$

4

 

 

$

357

 

 

(1)

Service revenue in the Consolidated Statement of Operations includes the ongoing service revenue shown above as well as revenue from project-based document management and managed print services businesses, which is included in Other above.

 

(2)

Other includes revenue from professional services, non-recurring engineering services, project-based document management and managed print services businesses, tenant rent and related property management services and licensing.

 

[15]


Product Portfolio Summary:

 

 

 

Three Months Ended

 

 

 

March 31, 2018

 

 

 

Print Systems

 

 

Enterprise Inkjet Solutions

 

 

Flexographic Packaging Printing

 

 

Software & Solutions

 

 

Consumer & Film

 

 

Advanced Materials and 3D Printing

 

 

Eastman Business Park

 

 

Total

 

Growth engines (1)

 

$

35

 

 

$

18

 

 

$

29

 

 

$

20

 

 

$

3

 

 

$

1

 

 

$

 

 

$

106

 

Strategic other businesses (2)

 

 

170

 

 

 

 

 

 

8

 

 

 

 

 

 

40

 

 

 

 

 

 

4

 

 

 

222

 

Planned declining

   businesses (3)

 

 

11

 

 

 

13

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

5

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

29

 

 

 

$

216

 

 

$

31

 

 

$

37

 

 

$

20

 

 

$

48

 

 

$

1

 

 

$

4

 

 

$

357

 

 

(1)

Growth engines consist of Sonora, PROSPER, FLEXCEL NX, Software and Solutions, AM3D and brand licensing.

 

(2)

Strategic Other Businesses include plates, Computer to Plate (“CTP”) and related service, and Nexpress and related toner business in the Print Systems segment, non-FLEXCEL NX in the Flexographic Packaging segment, Motion Picture and Industrial Film and Chemicals in the Consumer and Film segment, Eastman Business Park and intellectual property licensing.

 

(3)

Planned Declining Businesses are product lines where the decision has been made to stop new product development and manage an orderly expected decline in the installed product and annuity base. These product families consist of Consumer Inkjet in the Consumer and Film segment, Versamark in the Enterprise Inkjet Systems segment and Digimaster in the Print Systems segment.

 

Geography:

 

 

 

Three Months Ended

 

 

 

March 31, 2018

 

 

 

Print Systems

 

 

Enterprise Inkjet Solutions

 

 

Flexographic Packaging Printing

 

 

Software & Solutions

 

 

Consumer & Film

 

 

Advanced Materials and 3D Technology Solutions

 

 

Eastman Business Park

 

 

Total

 

United States

 

$

57

 

 

$

11

 

 

$

6

 

 

$

7

 

 

$

32

 

 

$

1

 

 

$

4

 

 

$

118

 

Canada

 

 

3

 

 

 

 

 

 

1

 

 

 

1

 

 

 

1

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

6

 

North America

 

 

60

 

 

 

11

 

 

 

7

 

 

 

8

 

 

 

33

 

 

 

1

 

 

 

4

 

 

 

124

 

Europe, Middle East and Africa

 

 

93

 

 

 

12

 

 

 

16

 

 

 

6

 

 

 

5

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

132

 

Asia Pacific

 

 

49